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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > General

Last additions - General
KENDAL_BOOK.pdf
KENDAL_BOOK.pdfIntroducing Buddhism689 viewsIntroducing Buddhism was originally published by The Buddhist Society London in 1988, to accompany the Buddhist Society’s Introducing Buddhism Course, on which Jacquetta Gomes Bodhicarini Upasika Jayasili was one of the teachers. Introducing Buddhism has subsequently been published by different organisations in different countries.Jan 21, 2016
wheel273.pdf
wheel273.pdfAnanda the Guardian of the Dhamma764 viewsAnanda’s praise has been voiced on many occasions in the Páli Canon. The greatest recognition for a monk would surely have been when the Buddha asked him to substitute for him as a teacher and then later confirmed that he, himself, would not have presented the teachings in any other way. This praise was given by the Exalted One to Sáriputta (another famous disciple) and to Ánanda.Jun 16, 2014
wheel394.pdf
wheel394.pdfFundamentals of Buddhism 982 viewsFour Lectures:

1. The Essence of Buddhism (Radio Lecture, Colombo, 1933)
2. Kamma & Rebirth (Lecture, Ceylon University, 1947)
3. Paticca-Samuppada: Dependent Origination (Second Lecture under the Dona Alphina Ratnayaka Trust, University College, Colombo, 1938)
4. Mental Culture (Based on a lecture delivered in Tokyo, 1920).
Jun 16, 2014
wheel271.pdf
wheel271.pdfBag of Bones - A Miscellany on the Body787 viewsThe body is thought to be most obviously “me,” what I regard as the most tangible part of myself. Around it therefore are constructed many views, all of them distorted to some extent, which prevent insight arising into the body as it really is. This book is a small anthology relating to the body in various ways, and presents material which, if contemplated by the earnest and sincere student of Dhamma, will eventually provide fruitful insight and, thereby, freedom from the many desires and fears centered on the body.Jun 16, 2014
wheel105.pdf
wheel105.pdfThe Four Nutriments of Life - An Anthology of Buddhist Texts767 viewsAll being subsist on nutriment” — this, according to the Buddha, is the one single fact about life that, above all, deserves to be remembered, contemplated and understood. If understood widely and deeply enough, this saying of the Buddha reveals indeed a truth that leads to the root of all existence and also to its uprooting. Here, too, the Buddha proved to be one who “saw to the root of things”. Hence, it was thought useful to collect his utterances on the subject of nutriment, together with the instructive explanations by the teachers of old, the commentators of the Páli scriptures.Jun 16, 2014
wheel001.pdf
wheel001.pdfThe Seven Factors of Enlightenment1102 viewsThe Tipitaka, the Buddhist canon, is replete with references to the factors of enlightenment expounded by the Enlightened One on different occasions under different circumstances. In the Book of the Kindred Sayings, V (Saíyutta Nikáya, Mahá Vagga) we find a special section under the title Bojjhaóga Saíyutta wherein the Buddha discourses on the Seven Factors of Enlightenment in diverse ways. In this section we read a series of three discourses or sermons recited by Buddhists since the time of the Buddha as a protection (paritta or pirit) against pain, disease, and adversity.Jun 16, 2014
bps-essay_39.pdf
bps-essay_39.pdfLifestyles and Spiritual Progress1381 viewsNew comers to Buddhism often ask whether a person’s lifestyle has any special bearing on their ability to progress along the Buddha’s path, and in particular whether the Buddha had a compelling reason for establishing a monastic order governed by guidelines quite different from those that hold sway over the lay Buddhist community. If we suspend concern for questions of status and superiority and simply consider the two modes of life in their ideal expression, the conclusion would have to follow that the monastic life, lived in the way envisioned by the Buddha, is the one that conduces more effectively to the final goal.Jun 16, 2014
bl109.pdf
bl109.pdfPositive Response - How to Meet Evil With Good1805 viewsThis booklet contains a collection of short suttas spoken by the Buddha and a passage from the Visuddhimagga, each preceded by a brief introduction by the translator. The unifying theme of these pieces may be called a positive response in dealing with provocative people and situations. The texts set forth practical techniques taught by the Buddha for overcoming resentment, hatred and other such pollutants, and for cultivating such elevating mental qualities as good will, amity and compassion. For anyone intent on spiritual development these practical instructions will help to cleanse the mind and to unfold its great hidden potentials.Jun 16, 2014
udana.pdf
udana.pdfUdana: Exclamations826 viewsThe role of the Udana within the context of the Pali Canon is to focus on the values and principles—“meaning” in the larger sense of the term—that underlie the Buddha’s teachings. This point can be seen clearly in how each udana is organized. It begins with a narrative of an event or series of events, followed (with a few variations) by the formula: “Then, on realizing the significance/meaning (attha) of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed.” This, in turn, is followed by a spontaneous exclamation—a poem, a passage of prose, or a combination of the two—in which the Buddha expresses what that meaning or significance is.Jun 14, 2014
strength.pdf
strength.pdfInner Strength & Parting Gifts: Talks by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo784 viewsThe sixteen talks translated here are actually reconstructions of Ajaan Lee’s talks made by one of his followers - a nun, Arun Abhivanna - based on notes she made while listening to him teach. With a few exceptions - the talks dated 1958 and 1959, which were printed after Ajaan Lee’s death - all were checked and approved by Ajaan Lee and printed in a volume entitled, The Way to Practice Insight Meditation, Collected from Four Years’ Sermons.Jun 14, 2014
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