Buddhist eLibrary - An Online Digitl Resource Library Home :: Login
 
 
Home About Contact Admin Choose a language
eBook Library Image Library Audio Library Video Library
 
 
Partners
Launch Mobile Site
Buddhist eLibrary Feature: Buddhist Studies
Links
exabytes network
Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > General

Last additions - General
dietolive.pdf
dietolive.pdfDying to Live2135 viewsThere are different views and beliefs about what happens after death. Tibetan (Vajrayana) and Chinese (Mahayana) Buddhists believe that after death, the spirit of the dead person passes through an intermediate period (bardo in Tibetan, zhong yin in Mandarin)- which may last for as long as forty-nine days - during which it undergoes a series of unearthly, extraordinary experiences, including a "small death" at the end of each week, before it is finally reborn into another realm of existence. In contrast, orthodox Theravada Buddhism, which is the earliest extant record of Gotama Buddha's teaching, asserts that rebirth takes place immediately after death.Jan 01, 1970
good_evil_beyond.pdf
good_evil_beyond.pdfGood, Evil and Beyond1787 viewsFor the modern Westerner, the teaching of kamma offers a path of practice based not on fear of a higher authority, nor dogma, but rather founded on a clear understanding of the natural law of cause and effect as it relates to human behaviour. It is a teaching to be not so much believed as understood and seen in operation.Jan 01, 1970
roots_goodevil.pdf
roots_goodevil.pdfThe Roots of Good and Evil1398 viewsGreed, hatred, and delusion - these are the three bad roots in us. Conversely the good ones are non-greed (i.e generosity), non-hatred (love), and non-delusion (wisdom). All our troubles and suffering stem essentially from the bad roots while our joy and happiness comes from the good ones. It is important to know and understand these roots if we are going to make an end of suffering and attain true peace and happiness. This book explains in a penetrative way the nature of these six roots. It contains discourses of the Buddha on the subject together with traditional commentarial explanations.Jan 01, 1970
volition.pdf
volition.pdfVolition and the Law of Kamma1610 viewsWhat is kamma? The Buddha said: "Oh monks, it is volition that I call kamma." The popular meaning of kamma is action or doing, but as a technical term, kamma means volition or will. When you do something, there is volition behind it, and that volition, that mental effort, is called kamma. The Buddha explained that, having willed, one then acts through body, speech, and mind. Whatever you do, there is some kind of kamma, mental effort, will, and volition. Volition is one of the fifty-two mental states which arise together with consciousness.Jan 01, 1970
noinnercore.pdf
noinnercore.pdfNo Inner Core1439 viewsAnatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, "an" meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul. The word atta, however, has a wide range of meanings, and some of those meanings cross over into the fields of psychology, philosophy, and everyday terminology, as, for example, when atta can mean self, being, ego, and personality. Therefore, we will examine and elucidate the wide range of meanings which atta can signify in order to determine exactly what the Buddha denied when He proclaimed that He teaches anatt?, that is, when He denied the existence of atta. We will examine both Buddhist and non-Buddhist definitions of the term soul, and we will also examine modern definitions of terms such as ego and self.Jan 01, 1970
taste-freedom.pdf
taste-freedom.pdfA Taste of Freedom1606 viewsVenerable Ajahn Chah always gave his talks in simple, everyday language. His objective was to clarify the Dhamma, not to confuse his listeners with an overload of information. Consequently the talks presented here have been rendered into correspondingly simple English. The aim has been to present Ajahn Chah's teaching in both the spirit and the letter. In 1976 Venerable Ajahn Chah was invited to England together with Ajahn Sumedho, the outcome of which was eventually the establishment of the first branch monastery of Wat Pa Pong outside of Thailand. Since then, further branch monasteries have been established in England, Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand and Italy.Jan 01, 1970
teachings_chah.pdf
teachings_chah.pdfThe Teachings of Ajahn Chah1500 viewsThe following Dhamma books of Ajahn Chah have been included in this collection of Ajahn Chah's Dhamma talks: Bodhinyana (1982); A Taste of Freedom (fifth impression.2002); Living Dhamma (1992); Food for the Heart (1992); The Path to Peace (1996); Clarity of Insight (2000); Unshakeable Peace (2003); Everything is Teaching Us (2004). Also some as yet unpublished talks have been included in the last section called `More Dhamma Talks'. We hope our efforts in compiling this collection of Dhamma talks of Ajahn Chah will be of benefit. (Wat Pah Nanachat)Jan 01, 1970
dhamma-nibbana.pdf
dhamma-nibbana.pdfPractising Dhamma with a View to Nibbana2058 viewsRadhika Abeysekera began teaching and writing books on the Dhamma to help reintroduce Buddhism to immigrants in non-Buddhist countries. The books are designed in such a manner that a parent or educator can use them to teach Buddhism to a child. Mrs. Abeysekera feels strongly that parents should first study and practise the Dhamma to the best of their ability to obtain maximum benefits, because what you do not possess you cannot give to your child. The books were also designed to foster understanding of the Dhamma among non-Buddhists, so that there can be peace and harmony through understanding and respect for the philosophies and faiths of others.Jan 01, 1970
essentialsof.pdf
essentialsof.pdfEssentials of Buddhism3190 viewsIt is based on the Theravada Buddhism syllabus of the Postgraduate Diploma Examination in Buddhist Studies course of the Buddhist and Pali University of Sri Lanka. Since the work is meant for students, every chapter appears as a unit by itself and is confined to a few pages. Ven. Ganarama is the Principal of the Buddhist and Pali College of Singapore.Jan 01, 1970
tree-forest.pdf
tree-forest.pdfA Tree in the Forest1708 viewsPeople have asked me about my practice. How do I prepare my mind for meditation? There is nothing special. I just keep it where it always is. They ask. Then are you an Arahant? Do I know? I am like a tree in the forest, full of leaves, blossoms and fruit. Birds come to eat and nest, and animals seek rest in the shade. Yet the tree does not know itself. It follows its own nature. It is as it is. - Ajahn Chah.Jan 01, 1970
41 files on 5 page(s) 4

Social Bookmarks