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File09_Not-self.mp3
File09_Not-self.mp3Not-Self966 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

We come to Anattalakkhana Sutta (Characteristics of not-self), where the Buddha presents the five aggregates associated with clinging and reveals their real nature. The five aggregates are one of the two main ways in which the Buddha analyses the nature of the human being. They represent what we cling to to create our sense of who we are and what the world is.

We look at the Buddha’s description of how we construct our identity through the three movements of: craving (tanha), the drive to possess; conceit (mana), our fundamental sense of separation and identity; and view (ditthi), the completed concept we have of ourselves-within-our-world. We consider how the Buddha's understanding of not-self (anatta) plays out in his understanding of life-after-life. If there is, fundamentally, no-one here, then who moves from one life to another?
File11_Practising_not-self.mp3
File11_Practising_not-self.mp3Practising Not-Self715 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

We continue with Anattalakkhana Sutta (Characteristics of not-self), seeing not-self (anatta) as a practice rather than as a doctrine. This practice revolves around the fundamental turning point of nibbida, “disenchantment.” From disenchantment comes liberation, through the “just-this-ness” (tathata) of experience.
noinnercore.pdf
noinnercore.pdfNo Inner Core1466 viewsAnatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, "an" meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul. The word atta, however, has a wide range of meanings, and some of those meanings cross over into the fields of psychology, philosophy, and everyday terminology, as, for example, when atta can mean self, being, ego, and personality. Therefore, we will examine and elucidate the wide range of meanings which atta can signify in order to determine exactly what the Buddha denied when He proclaimed that He teaches anatt?, that is, when He denied the existence of atta. We will examine both Buddhist and non-Buddhist definitions of the term soul, and we will also examine modern definitions of terms such as ego and self.
Way-it-is-by-ajahn-sumedho.pdf
Way-it-is-by-ajahn-sumedho.pdfThe Way It Is 2250 viewsThis book contains a collection of teachings of Ajahn Sumedho given to people who are familiar with the conventions of Theravada Buddhism and have some experience of meditation. Most of the chapters are edited from talks given during retreats for lay people for Ajahn Sumedho's monastic (ordained) disciples, so they require some careful attention and are best read in sequence. In many of these talks Ajahn Sumedho expounds on the uniquely Buddhist expression of 'not-self' (anatta). He maintains this to be the Buddha's way of pointing to the experience of Ultimate Reality that is the goal of many religions. During the monastic retreats Ajahn Sumedho frequently teaches the Dependent Origination paticca-samuppada based on the approach of anatta. The Dependent Origination traces the process whereby suffering (dukkha) is compounded out of ignorance (avijja) and conversely suffering is eliminated (or rather not created) with the cessation of ignorance. Just as anatta -- not-self -- is the expression of Ultimate Truth.
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