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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > General

Most viewed - General
ctp_book_v1.pdf
ctp_book_v1.pdfClearing the Path1684 viewsNOTE: Primarily the PDF CtPbookV1.pdf is made to be printed as a book. Other versions of this PDF are modified to be better viewed on screen - whilst another is already pre-printed in PDF format as a 2-up meaning that there are 2 pages per A4 Landscape oriented page to make for easier printout (on A4 paper) for personal use.
gratitude.pdf
gratitude.pdfGratitude in the Buddha’s Teachings1661 viewsThis text, with an introduction on the subject of gratitude in the Buddha's Teachings has extacts from Pali Suttas on Gratitude and Suttas on Ingratitude. In the Mangala Sutta, the Buddha declares that the quality of gratitude to be one of the highest blessings, thus showing how it plays a key role in His ethical and spiritual teachings.
volition.pdf
volition.pdfVolition and the Law of Kamma1610 viewsWhat is kamma? The Buddha said: "Oh monks, it is volition that I call kamma." The popular meaning of kamma is action or doing, but as a technical term, kamma means volition or will. When you do something, there is volition behind it, and that volition, that mental effort, is called kamma. The Buddha explained that, having willed, one then acts through body, speech, and mind. Whatever you do, there is some kind of kamma, mental effort, will, and volition. Volition is one of the fifty-two mental states which arise together with consciousness.
taste-freedom.pdf
taste-freedom.pdfA Taste of Freedom1606 viewsVenerable Ajahn Chah always gave his talks in simple, everyday language. His objective was to clarify the Dhamma, not to confuse his listeners with an overload of information. Consequently the talks presented here have been rendered into correspondingly simple English. The aim has been to present Ajahn Chah's teaching in both the spirit and the letter. In 1976 Venerable Ajahn Chah was invited to England together with Ajahn Sumedho, the outcome of which was eventually the establishment of the first branch monastery of Wat Pa Pong outside of Thailand. Since then, further branch monasteries have been established in England, Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand and Italy.
teachings_chah.pdf
teachings_chah.pdfThe Teachings of Ajahn Chah1500 viewsThe following Dhamma books of Ajahn Chah have been included in this collection of Ajahn Chah's Dhamma talks: Bodhinyana (1982); A Taste of Freedom (fifth impression.2002); Living Dhamma (1992); Food for the Heart (1992); The Path to Peace (1996); Clarity of Insight (2000); Unshakeable Peace (2003); Everything is Teaching Us (2004). Also some as yet unpublished talks have been included in the last section called `More Dhamma Talks'. We hope our efforts in compiling this collection of Dhamma talks of Ajahn Chah will be of benefit. (Wat Pah Nanachat)
noinnercore.pdf
noinnercore.pdfNo Inner Core1439 viewsAnatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, "an" meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul. The word atta, however, has a wide range of meanings, and some of those meanings cross over into the fields of psychology, philosophy, and everyday terminology, as, for example, when atta can mean self, being, ego, and personality. Therefore, we will examine and elucidate the wide range of meanings which atta can signify in order to determine exactly what the Buddha denied when He proclaimed that He teaches anatt?, that is, when He denied the existence of atta. We will examine both Buddhist and non-Buddhist definitions of the term soul, and we will also examine modern definitions of terms such as ego and self.
bps-essay_39.pdf
bps-essay_39.pdfLifestyles and Spiritual Progress1400 viewsNew comers to Buddhism often ask whether a person’s lifestyle has any special bearing on their ability to progress along the Buddha’s path, and in particular whether the Buddha had a compelling reason for establishing a monastic order governed by guidelines quite different from those that hold sway over the lay Buddhist community. If we suspend concern for questions of status and superiority and simply consider the two modes of life in their ideal expression, the conclusion would have to follow that the monastic life, lived in the way envisioned by the Buddha, is the one that conduces more effectively to the final goal.
roots_goodevil.pdf
roots_goodevil.pdfThe Roots of Good and Evil1398 viewsGreed, hatred, and delusion - these are the three bad roots in us. Conversely the good ones are non-greed (i.e generosity), non-hatred (love), and non-delusion (wisdom). All our troubles and suffering stem essentially from the bad roots while our joy and happiness comes from the good ones. It is important to know and understand these roots if we are going to make an end of suffering and attain true peace and happiness. This book explains in a penetrative way the nature of these six roots. It contains discourses of the Buddha on the subject together with traditional commentarial explanations.
iabu_journal.pdf
iabu_journal.pdfThe Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Universities1391 viewsThe journal of the International Association of Buddhist Universities
craft.pdf
craft.pdfThe Craft of the Heart, by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo1360 viewsThis book, Ajaan Lee’s first, is like a catalog. In it, he gives the full range of his teachings on the practice of the Buddha’s craft, from the observance of the five precepts to the attainment of total liberation. Thus the different parts are written for different people at different stages in the practice, and the reader is advised to read, not judgmentally, but judiciously - taking whatever is useful for his or her own practice, and leaving the rest for others.
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