Buddhist eLibrary - An Online Digitl Resource Library Home :: Login
 
 
Home About Contact Admin Choose a language
eBook Library Image Library Audio Library Video Library
 
 
Partners
Launch Mobile Site
Buddhist eLibrary Feature: Buddhist Studies
Links
exabytes network
Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > General

Most viewed - General
refuge.pdf
refuge.pdfRefuge: An Introduction to the Buddha, Dhamma & Sangha806 viewsThe refuges in Buddhism - both on the internal and on the external levels - are the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, also known as the Triple Gem. They are called gems both because they are valuable and because, in ancient times, gems were believed to have protective powers. The Triple Gem outdoes other gems in this respect because its protective powers can be put to the test and can lead further than those of any physical gem, all the way to absolute freedom from uncertainties of the realm of ageing, illness, and death.
wheel271.pdf
wheel271.pdfBag of Bones - A Miscellany on the Body795 viewsThe body is thought to be most obviously “me,” what I regard as the most tangible part of myself. Around it therefore are constructed many views, all of them distorted to some extent, which prevent insight arising into the body as it really is. This book is a small anthology relating to the body in various ways, and presents material which, if contemplated by the earnest and sincere student of Dhamma, will eventually provide fruitful insight and, thereby, freedom from the many desires and fears centered on the body.
strength.pdf
strength.pdfInner Strength & Parting Gifts: Talks by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo793 viewsThe sixteen talks translated here are actually reconstructions of Ajaan Lee’s talks made by one of his followers - a nun, Arun Abhivanna - based on notes she made while listening to him teach. With a few exceptions - the talks dated 1958 and 1959, which were printed after Ajaan Lee’s death - all were checked and approved by Ajaan Lee and printed in a volume entitled, The Way to Practice Insight Meditation, Collected from Four Years’ Sermons.
noblestrategy.pdf
noblestrategy.pdfNoble Strategy: Essays of the Buddhist Path791 viewsThe essays in this book present views on basic elements in the Buddhist path—the attitudes, concepts, and practices that lead to total freedom for the mind. If the views are right, they themselves form a part of the path. Thus, in learning how to make best use of these essays, it’s important to understand how views function in bringing about freedom.
shapeofsuffering.pdf
shapeofsuffering.pdfThe Shape of Suffering: A Study of Dependent Co-arising785 viewsThe Buddha devoted his life, after his Awakening, to showing a reliable way to the end of stress. In summarizing the whole of his teaching, he said: “Both formerly & now, it is only stress that I describe, and the cessation of stress.” SN 22:86. These were the issues he taught for 45 years. In some cases, he would give a succinct explanation of stress and its cessation. In others, he would explain them in more detail. His most detailed explanation is called dependent co-arising—Paticca Samuppada. This detailed summary of the causal factors leading up to stress shows why the experience of suffering and stress can be so bewildering, for the interaction among these factors can be very complex. The body of this book is devoted to explaining these factors and their interactions, to show how they can provide focus to a path of practice leading to the ending of stress.
wheel105.pdf
wheel105.pdfThe Four Nutriments of Life - An Anthology of Buddhist Texts775 viewsAll being subsist on nutriment” — this, according to the Buddha, is the one single fact about life that, above all, deserves to be remembered, contemplated and understood. If understood widely and deeply enough, this saying of the Buddha reveals indeed a truth that leads to the root of all existence and also to its uprooting. Here, too, the Buddha proved to be one who “saw to the root of things”. Hence, it was thought useful to collect his utterances on the subject of nutriment, together with the instructive explanations by the teachers of old, the commentators of the Páli scriptures.
wheel273.pdf
wheel273.pdfAnanda the Guardian of the Dhamma775 viewsAnanda’s praise has been voiced on many occasions in the Páli Canon. The greatest recognition for a monk would surely have been when the Buddha asked him to substitute for him as a teacher and then later confirmed that he, himself, would not have presented the teachings in any other way. This praise was given by the Exalted One to Sáriputta (another famous disciple) and to Ánanda.
headandheartbook.pdf
headandheartbook.pdfHead and Heart Together: Essays on the Buddhist Path764 viewsContents: The Lessons of Gratitude; No Strings Attached; The Power of Judgment; Think like a Thief; Strength Training for the Mind; Mindfulness Defined; The Joy of Effort; Head & Heart Together; The Wisdom of the Ego; Ignorance; Food for Awakening; The Buddha via the Bible; Freedom from Buddha Nature.
paradoxofbecoming.pdf
paradoxofbecoming.pdfThe Paradox of Becoming749 viewsThe topic of becoming, although it features one major paradox, contains other paradoxes as well. Not the least of these is the fact that, although becoming is one of the most important concepts in the Buddha’s teachings, there is no full-scale treatment of it in the English language. This book is an attempt to fill that lack.

The importance of becoming is evident from the role it plays in the Four Noble Truths, particularly in the second: Suffering and stress are caused by any form of craving that leads to becoming. Thus the end of suffering must involve the end of becoming.
skill-in-questions.pdf
skill-in-questions.pdfSkill in Questions: How The Buddha Taught749 viewsThis is a book about discernment in action, centered on the Buddha’s strategic use of discernment in framing and responding to questions. The idea for this book was born more than a decade ago from reading a number of Buddha’s discourses. The first was SN 44:10, in which he refused to answer the question of whether there is or is not a self. This discourse called attention to the fact that the Buddha had clear ideas about which questions his teachings were meant to answer, and which ones they weren’t. I realized that if I wanted to understand and get the best use out of his teaching on not-self, I had to find the questions to which this teaching was a response and not take it out of context.
41 files on 5 page(s) 4

Social Bookmarks