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Home > eBook Library > Mahayana Texts > General

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advice.pdf
advice.pdfAdvice for Monks and Nuns2057 viewsThe continued existence of the Buddha Dharma depends upon the continued existence of the Sangha - the community of ordained practitioners, monks and nuns - one of the three Buddhist Refuges. In these talks, Lama Yeshe and Lama Zopa Rinpoche explain the great benefits of practicing Dharma as an ordained person, how to keep the ordination pure, the purpose of the monastic community, how to live together as monks and nuns, and much more. The necessity for the lay community to support the Sangha is also made clear, and not only monks and nuns but lay practitioners, too, will gain much by reading this book.
matrcetahymn.pdf
matrcetahymn.pdfMatrceta's Hymn to the Buddha1751 viewsI-tsing, the Chinese pilgrim who travelled through India in the 7th century AD, says of Matrceta's poems: These charming compositions are equal in beauty to the heavenly flowers and rival in dignity the lofty peaks of a mountain. Consequently in India all who compose hymns imitate his style, considering him the father of literature. Even men like Bodhisattvas Asanga and Vasubandhu admired him greatly.
Nagarjuna.pdf
Nagarjuna.pdfNāgārjuna and the Philosophy of Upāya1741 viewsThe purpose of this article is to offer a different account of Nagarjuna than is found in contemporary Western scholarship. It will not ask what it means for causality, truth, the self, or consciousness to be "empty" in a very general sense, but rather how Nāgārjuna's philosophy relates to the soteriological practices of Buddhism and what it means for those practices to be "empty" of inherent nature. Rather than describing Nāgārjuna as a metaphysician this study will situate him squarely within the early Mahayana tradition and the philosophical problem of practice that is expressed through the doctrine of “skill-in-means” (upāya-kausalya).
Nagarjuna-upaya.pdf
Nagarjuna-upaya.pdfNāgārjuna and the Philosophy of Upāya 1592 viewsThe purpose of this article is to offer a different account of Nāgārjuna than is found in contemporary Western scholarship. It will not ask what it means for causality, truth, the self, or consciousness to be "empty" in a very general sense, but rather how Nāgārjuna’s philosophy relates to the soteriological practices of Buddhism and what it means for those practices to be "empty" of inherent nature. Rather than describing Nāgārjuna as a metaphysician this study will situate him squarely within the early Mahāyāna tradition and the philosophical problem of practice that is expressed through the doctrine of “skill-in-means” (upāya-kauśalya). It should become evident in what follows that the doctrine of upāya has little in common with Western metaphysics. It is unconcerned with problems regarding causality, personal identity, consciousness, logic, language, or any other issues that are unrelated to specific problems surrounding the nature and efficacy of Buddhist practice. Given that every major tradition in Buddhism stresses the indispensable nature of practice, it is highly unlikely that Nagarjuna’s philosophy is concerned with metaphysical issues or that his doctrine of “emptiness” can be separated from the soteriological practices of Buddhism.
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