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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts

Most viewed - Theravada Texts
ele_pali.pdf
ele_pali.pdfElementary Pali Course5891 viewsThis Elementary Pali Course by the late Venerable Narada Thera, the renowned Buddhist scholar of the Vjirarama Vihara, Colombo, Sri Lanka, is the standard work for the study of the elementary level of Pali. Pali was the language spoken by the Buddha, and employed by him to expound his teachings. It is also the scriptural language used by the Theravada school of Buddhism.
01_intro_dependorig.pdf
01_intro_dependorig.pdf01 Dependent Arising4981 viewsAn introduction to dependent arising, focusing on the three key concepts of specific conditionality, dependent arising and the the dependently arisen.
palidict.pdf
palidict.pdfPali Buddhist Dictionary [4th Edition]4927 viewsThis is an authentic dictionary of Buddhist doctrinal terms, used in the Pali Canon and its Commentaries. It provides the reader not with a mere enumeration of Pali terms and their English equivalents, but offers precise and authentic definitions and explanations of canonical and post-canonical terms and doctrines, based on the Suttas, Abhidhamma and the Commentaries.
abhidhamma.pdf
abhidhamma.pdfA Manual of Abhidhamma (Abhidhammattha Sangaha)4708 viewsAbhidhamma is the Higher Teaching of the Buddha. It expounds the quintessence of His profound doctrine. The Dhamma, embodied in the Sutta Pitaka, is the conventional teaching, and the Abhidhamma is the ultimate teaching. In the Abhidhamma both mind and matter, which constitute this complex machinery of man, are microscopically analysed. Chief events connected with the process of birth and death are explained in detail. Intricate points of the Dhamma are clarified.
01_how_can_we_read.pdf
01_how_can_we_read.pdfReading the Suttas: How Can We Read?4249 viewsIntroduction. What is a sutta?

How would we read the Nikayas if we were academics?
How would we read the Nikayas if we were practitioners?

A study of the Kalama Sutta. This sutta is one of the most quoted in Western Buddhism, and the most quoted part of it is the section beginning:

“Kàlàmas, for you to doubt, to be uncertain; uncertainty has arisen in a doubtful matter. Do not rely upon what has been acquired by repeated tradition; nor upon lineage; nor upon rumour; nor upon what is handed down in the teachings; nor upon logic; nor upon inference; nor upon a consideration of reasons; nor upon a delight in speculation; nor upon appearances; nor upon respect for your teacher. Kàlàmas, when you know for yourselves: These things are unskilful; these things are blameable; these things are censured by the wise; undertaken and observed, these things lead to harm and suffering,’ then abandon them”.
damachak.pdf
damachak.pdfDhammacakkappavattana Sutta3697 viewsVen. Mahasi Sayadaw

The First Discourse of the Buddha, namely the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta, commonly known as the Great Discourse on the Wheel of Dhamma. This is a series of discourses on the Dhammacakka Sutta by the late Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw, a Questioner at the Sixth Buddhist Council in Myanmar, (Burma) 1954. Translated by U Ko Lay.
paligram.pdf
paligram.pdfA Grammar of the Pali Language3674 viewsMost introductory Pali grammar books consist of lessons that teach the elements of the language in stages, but because of that they are also very difficult to use as a reference when you need to look up a noun's declension, or a verb's conjugation. Because of its practical and comprehensive coverage of the elements of the Pali language in complete chapters, this book is a very useful reference. It was not written for linguistics experts, but for students with little experiences tudying Pali grammar.
abhidhaultsci.pdf
abhidhaultsci.pdfThe Buddha's Abhidhamma - Ultimate Science3666 viewsThe Abhidhamma, describes in detail the natures of the ultimate realities that really exist in nature but are unknown to scientists. His method of verification is superior to scientific methods which depend on instruments. He used his divine-eye to penetrate the coverings that hide the true nature of things. He also taught others how to develop concentration and how to observe with their mind-eyes the true nature of all things and finally the four Noble Truths.
10_ways_of_making_merit.pdf
10_ways_of_making_merit.pdfTen Ways of Making Merit3627 viewsThe Buddha taught that merit-making is a formidable antidote to overcome the many vicissitudes faced in our day-to-day lives. Hence He declared: ‘Do not fear merit-making. “Merit-making” is a term denoting happiness, what is desirable, pleasant, dear and charming. For I recall in my mind very well that after making merit for a long time, I experienced desirable, pleasant, dear and charming results for a long time. Let therefore a man train himself in merit-making that yields long-lasting happiness. Let him cultivate the practice of giving, virtuous conduct and a mind of metta. By cultivating these qualities the wise man arrives in untroubled and happy states.
allexistence.pdf
allexistence.pdfThe 31 Planes of Existence3406 viewsThe suttas describe the 31 distinct planes or realms of existence into which beings can be reborn during their long wanderings through samsara. These range from the extraordinarily dark, grim, and painful hell realms all the way up to the most sublime, refined and exquisitely blissful heavenly realms. Existence in every realm is impermanent; in the cosmology taught by the Buddha there is no eternal heaven or hell. Beings are born into a particular realm according to both their past kamma.
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