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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts

Most viewed - Theravada Texts
04_anapanasati_sutta.pdf
04_anapanasati_sutta.pdfThe Anapanasati Sutta3302 viewsThe Anapanasati Sutta is not an easy read, although the language itself is quite simple. But its structure is complex and dense, and this complexity raises serious questions about interpretation. The complexity of the structure creates ambiguity. Even the orthodox commentary sees certain passages as capable of different but simultaneous readings, referring to either serenity or insight practice depending on what approach to the practice the practitioner is taking.

We can see how Thich Nhat Hanh can take liberties with the text, but he does so to make the practice explained within it more accessible to ordinary lay people. Are we to assume that this was not the intention of the original compilers? Or can we see the complexity of the sutta as evidence of an attempt to create a discourse that different communities of practitioners could, quite legitimately, read in different ways? In any event, if we are to make sense of this sutta, and extract from it what it has to offer in terms of guidance on the practice, we need to read the structure of the text. It is not just the surface words that convey meaning, but the underlying networks that link the words.
essentialsof.pdf
essentialsof.pdfEssentials of Buddhism3215 viewsIt is based on the Theravada Buddhism syllabus of the Postgraduate Diploma Examination in Buddhist Studies course of the Buddhist and Pali University of Sri Lanka. Since the work is meant for students, every chapter appears as a unit by itself and is confined to a few pages. Ven. Ganarama is the Principal of the Buddhist and Pali College of Singapore.
abhistudy.pdf
abhistudy.pdfAbhidhamma Studies (Buddhist Psychology)2988 viewsThe content of these studies is rather varied: they include philosophical and psychological investigations, references to the practical application of the teachings concerned, pointers to neglected or unnoticed aspects of the Abhidhamma, textual research etc. This variety of contents serves to show that wherever we dig deep enough into that inexhaustible mine, the Abhidhamma literature, we shall meet with valuable contributions to the theoretical understanding and practical realization of Buddhist doctrine.
a_taste_of_salt(2).pdf
a_taste_of_salt(2).pdfA Taste of Salt2954 viewsThe Sutta Pitaka was written down in the Pali language over 2,000 years ago. The Sutta Pitaka is made of five collections of suttas; the Digha Nikaya, the Majjima Nikaya, the Samyutta Nikaya, the Anguttara Nikaya, and the Khuddaka Nikaya. These texts remain the most complete record of early Buddhist teachings. The suttas fill thousands of pages, and it is a daunting task for most readers to read through the many volumes. A Taste of Salt draws 350 pages containing the central teachings of the Buddha from the roughly 5,000 pages of the Sutta Pitaka. The purpose of this collection is to make these essential texts more accessible to meditators and students of Buddhism.
bhkkrule.pdf
bhkkrule.pdfThe Bhikkhus' Rules - Guide for Laypeople2917 viewsThe Theravadin Buddhist Monk's Rules by compiled and explained by Bhikkhu Ariyesako. Some may think that this lineage follows an overly traditionalist approach but then, it does happen to be the oldest living tradition. A slight caution therefore to anyone completely new to the ways of monasticism, which may appear quite radical for the modern day and age. The best introduction, perhaps essential for a true understanding, is meeting with a practising bhikkhu who should manifest and reflect the peaceful and joyous qualities of the bhikkhu's way of life.
paliwordday.pdf
paliwordday.pdfA Pali Word A Day2826 viewsA selection of Pali words for daily reflection. This booklet aims to assist new Buddhist students who are unfamiliar with some of the Pali words often used in the study of Buddhism. As the title suggests, it encourages the learning and use of Pali words by learning one word a day. This booklet can serve both as a dictionary and a glossary of terms for your reference.
02_mahanidana.pdf
02_mahanidana.pdf02 Dependent Arising: Examining specific conditionality2804 viewsExamining specific conditionality, with an emphasis on the
relationship between consciousness and mind/body.
vandana.pdf
vandana.pdfBhavana Vandana - Book of Devotion2683 viewsThe purpose of this book is manifold. One is to teach the users of this Vandana book how to pronounce Pali words correctly. By the daily repetition of these Pali verses and Suttas people can learn the Pali pronunciation without much effort. Secondly we intend to teach people the Pali language without much toil. Therefore we made one half of our chanting in English, so people learn the meaning of what they chant in Pali and later on they can compare the English with the Pali. Thirdly, we intend to teach people Dhamma through devotional service. In order to fulfill all these purposes we decided to include certain Suttas which are not normally used in Viharas for vandana service.
03_mahatanhasankhaya.pdf
03_mahatanhasankhaya.pdf03 Dependent Arising: Nature of Consciousness2664 viewsContinuing to examine the nature of consciousness and related themes, such as its relationship to identity and insight.
geth0401.pdf
geth0401.pdfCan Killing a Living Being Ever Be an Act of Compassion?2653 viewsThe analysis of the act of killing in the Abhidhamma & Pali Commentaries.

Abstract: In the Theravadin exegetical tradition, the notion that intentionally killing a living being is wrong involves a claim that when certain mental states (such as compassion) are present in the mind, it is simply impossible that one could act in certain ways (such as to intentionally kill). Contrary to what Keown has claimed, the only criterion for judging whether an act is “moral” (kusala) or “immoral” (akusala) in Indian systematic Buddhist thought is the quality of the intention that motivates it. The idea that killing a living being might be a solution to the problem of suffering runs counter to the Buddhist emphasis on dukkha as a reality that must be understood. The cultivation of friendliness in the face of suffering is seen as something that can bring beneficial effects for self and others in a situation where it might seem that compassion should lead one to kill.
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