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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts

Most viewed - Theravada Texts
mahasati.pdf
mahasati.pdfMaha Satipatthana Sutta2635 viewsVen. U Jotika and Ven. U Dhamminda

Practise in accordance with this Mahasatipatthana Sutta so that you can see why it is acknowledged as the most important Sutta that the Buddha taught. Try to practise all the different sections from time to time as they are all useful, but in the beginning start with something simple such as being mindful while walking, or the mindfulness of in and out breathing. Then as you practise these you will be able to practise the other sections contained within this Sutta and you will find that all the four satipatthanas can be practised concurrently. A Sutta should be read again and again as you will tend to forget its message. The message here in this Sutta is that you should be mindful of whatever is occurring in the body and mind, whether it be good or bad, and thus you will become aware that all conditioned phenomena are impermanent, unsatisfactory and not self.
words_of_buddha.pdf
words_of_buddha.pdfDaily Readings from Buddha's Words of Wisdom2606 viewsVen. Shravasti Dhammika

For over two millennium the discourses of the Buddha have nourished the spiritual lives of countless millions of people in India, Sri Lanka, Burma and Thailand. This book contains extracts from some of these discourses selected from the Pali Tipitaka and also from some post-canonical writings. Rendered into readable English, presented so that one extract can be read and reflected upon each day of the year and provided with a Readers Guide, this book is an indispensable companion for anyone trying to apply the Buddha's gentle message to their daily life.
05_satipatthana_sutta_01.pdf
05_satipatthana_sutta_01.pdf01 Satipatthana Sutta2578 viewsWe have seen how different approaches to translation provide different approaches to the meditation practice itself. Translation, interpretation and practice all take place within communities. One's choices in translation is also an expression of one's identity. If I identify with a specific tradition, I will translate in a way that fits with that tradition's view of the teaching and the practice. If I refuse to identify with a tradition, preferring to go my own way or be part of the creation of a new tradition, this choice also will condition translation and interpretation. And interpretation conditions practice. The practice is defined by its texts, and the texts are formed by translation and interpretation.
bhikkhuni_patimokkha.pdf
bhikkhuni_patimokkha.pdfThe Bhikkhuni Patimokkha of the Six Schools2556 viewsDr. Chatsumarn Kabilsingh has translated the monastic rules of Buddhist nuns or the Patimokkha of the Six Schools, which will help us to learn and compare Theravada, Mahasanghika, Mahisasaka, Sarvastivada, Dhamagupta and Mula-Sarvastivada. The study of the patimokkha also provides insight into the historical context from which the rules took place. This translation will also provide valuable material for concerned Buddhist scholars.
vandana02.pdf
vandana02.pdfVandana: Pali Devotional Chanting2524 viewsIt is beneficial for every Buddhist to recite daily and learn Pali at least a few verses from the Vandana, recalling to mind the sublime qualities of the Buddha, Dhamma and the Sangha. Contemplation on these great qualities will make our minds calm, peaceful and serene.
04_vibhanga.pdf
04_vibhanga.pdf04 Dependent Arising: Vibhanga2520 viewsLooking at the standard "twelvefold formula" of dependent arising,and the question of life-after-life, or "rebirth.
Between_The_Lines_Vol2_By_Sylvia_Bay_2015.pdf
Between_The_Lines_Vol2_By_Sylvia_Bay_2015.pdfBetween The Lines (Volume 2) An analytical appreciation of the Buddha's Life 2495 viewsThis book seeks to bring the historical Buddha back into the popular psyche. That story is as intriguing, and is perhaps even more inspiring than the best fantasy story that had ever been woven.
damapada.pdf
damapada.pdfThe Dhammapada, a Translation2480 viewsVen. Thanissaro, Bhikkhu

The Dhammapada has long been recognized as one of the masterpieces of early Buddhist literature. Only more recently have scholars realized that it is also one of the early masterpieces of the Indian tradition of Kavya, or belles lettres. This translation is an attempt to render the verses into English in a way that does justice to both of the traditions to which the text belongs. Although it is tempting to view these traditions as distinct, dealing with form (Kavya) and content (Buddhism), the ideals of Kavya aimed at combining form and content into a seamless whole.
73_knowledges.pdf
73_knowledges.pdfSeventy-Three Kinds of Knowledge2457 viewsVen. Nyanadassana, Bhikkhu

Since these knowledges are, as a Summary, very briefly stated,the present translation has explanatory notes in order to facilitate the reader understand them, at least intellectually, more easily. These explanations are based on the Pañisambhid -magga, the Visuddhi-magga and their corresponding Commentaries, and their references are clearly distinguished. The translation of each knowledge
is repeated in the Notes, in bold, for convenient reading.
Between_The_Lines_Vol__1.pdf
Between_The_Lines_Vol__1.pdfBetween The Lines (Volume 1) An analytical appreciation of the Buddha's Life 2410 views"Some 2500 years ago in ancient Northeast India, a young, brilliant and courageous man discovered the sublime answer to how the mind works and how to realise unconditioned happiness and bliss. For the next 45 years, he devoted his life to teaching the doctrine that helped bring unparalleled happiness, peace and relief to numerous people long after his death. In time stories began to emerge proclaiming his greatness and his near-divinity status. Over generations and into distant lands, those stories took on a life of their own. Eventually the real man is buried under a mountain of beautiful fantasies and magical tales. Scholars in Buddhist studies have never lost sight of the historical Buddha. There is a beautiful story to tell about the real man but the materials never quite made it to the mass market because academic books are generally hard to read and appreciate.
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