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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts

Most viewed - Theravada Texts
teachings_chah.pdf
teachings_chah.pdfThe Teachings of Ajahn Chah1594 viewsThe following Dhamma books of Ajahn Chah have been included in this collection of Ajahn Chah's Dhamma talks: Bodhinyana (1982); A Taste of Freedom (fifth impression.2002); Living Dhamma (1992); Food for the Heart (1992); The Path to Peace (1996); Clarity of Insight (2000); Unshakeable Peace (2003); Everything is Teaching Us (2004). Also some as yet unpublished talks have been included in the last section called `More Dhamma Talks'. We hope our efforts in compiling this collection of Dhamma talks of Ajahn Chah will be of benefit. (Wat Pah Nanachat)
mission-accomplished.pdf
mission-accomplished.pdfThe Mission Accomplished1567 viewsA historical analysis of the Mahaparinibbana Sutta of the Digha Nikaya of the Pali Canon. The Mission Accomplished is undoubtedly an eye opening contribution to Buddhist analytical Pali studies. In this analytical and critical work Ven. Dr. Pategama Gnanarama enlightens us in many areas of subjects hitherto unexplored by scholars. His views on the beginnings of the Bhikkhuni Order are interesting and refreshing. They might even be provocative to traditional readers, yet be challenging to the feminists to adopt a most positive attitude to the problem. Prof. Chandima Wijebandara, University of Sri Jayawardhanapura, Sri Lanka.
Buddha_in_his_words.pdf
Buddha_in_his_words.pdfThe Buddha’s Teaching In His Own Words 1567 viewsThe present Wheel booklet contains Chapter 12 of Bhikkhu Nanmoli’s classic compilation, The Life of the Buddha according to the Pali Canon. The purpose of that book, now in print for 27 years, had been to construct a biography of the Buddha by piecing together all the relevant material scattered throughout the Vinaya and the Sutta Pitakas. Since the Buddha’s life was in many respects inseparable from his teaching, Ven. Nanamoli had included, in the middle of the book, an anthology of texts dealing with the teaching, which he entitled “The Doctrine”.
bps-essay_39.pdf
bps-essay_39.pdfLifestyles and Spiritual Progress1545 viewsNew comers to Buddhism often ask whether a person’s lifestyle has any special bearing on their ability to progress along the Buddha’s path, and in particular whether the Buddha had a compelling reason for establishing a monastic order governed by guidelines quite different from those that hold sway over the lay Buddhist community. If we suspend concern for questions of status and superiority and simply consider the two modes of life in their ideal expression, the conclusion would have to follow that the monastic life, lived in the way envisioned by the Buddha, is the one that conduces more effectively to the final goal.
noinnercore.pdf
noinnercore.pdfNo Inner Core1539 viewsAnatta is a Pali word consisting of a negative prefix, "an" meaning not, plus atta, soul, and is most literally translated as no-soul. The word atta, however, has a wide range of meanings, and some of those meanings cross over into the fields of psychology, philosophy, and everyday terminology, as, for example, when atta can mean self, being, ego, and personality. Therefore, we will examine and elucidate the wide range of meanings which atta can signify in order to determine exactly what the Buddha denied when He proclaimed that He teaches anatt?, that is, when He denied the existence of atta. We will examine both Buddhist and non-Buddhist definitions of the term soul, and we will also examine modern definitions of terms such as ego and self.
bmc2.pdf
bmc2.pdfThe Buddhist Monastic Code II1527 viewsThe Khandhaka Rules Translated and Explained

This volume is an attempt to give an organized, detailed account of the training rules found in the Khandhakas that govern the life of bhikkhus, together with the traditions that have grown up around them. It is a companion to The Buddhist Monastic Code, Volume One (BMC1), which offers a similar treatment of the Patimokkha training rules.
8_Precepts_Diacritials.pdf
8_Precepts_Diacritials.pdfEight Precepts (Diacritials)1510 viewsAjivatthamaka Sila (Eight Precepts with Right Livelihood as the Eighth) In Theravada Buddhism there are two versions of the Eight Precepts: Atthangika Uposatha Sila (Eight Uposatha Precepts) and Ajivatthamaka Sila (Eight Precepts with Right Livelihood as the Eighth).
craft.pdf
craft.pdfThe Craft of the Heart, by Ajaan Lee Dhammadharo1498 viewsThis book, Ajaan Lee’s first, is like a catalog. In it, he gives the full range of his teachings on the practice of the Buddha’s craft, from the observance of the five precepts to the attainment of total liberation. Thus the different parts are written for different people at different stages in the practice, and the reader is advised to read, not judgmentally, but judiciously - taking whatever is useful for his or her own practice, and leaving the rest for others.
Wings_of_Awakening.pdf
Wings_of_Awakening.pdfThe Wings to Awakening - An Anthology from the Pali Canon1489 viewsMany anthologies of the Buddha's teachings have appeared in English, but this is the first to be organized around the set of teachings that the Buddha himself said formed the heart of his message: the Wings to Awakening. The material is arranged in three parts, preceded by a long Introduction. The Introduction tries to define the concept of Awakening so as to give a clear sense of where the Wings to Awakening are headed. It does this by discussing the Buddha's accounts of his own Awakening, with special focus on the way in which the principle of skilful kamma formed both the “how" and the \what" of that Awakening: The Buddha was able to reach Awakening only by developing skilful kamma this is the “how"; his understanding of the process of developing skilful kamma is what sparked the insights that constituted Awakening - this is the “what."
roots_goodevil.pdf
roots_goodevil.pdfThe Roots of Good and Evil1465 viewsGreed, hatred, and delusion - these are the three bad roots in us. Conversely the good ones are non-greed (i.e generosity), non-hatred (love), and non-delusion (wisdom). All our troubles and suffering stem essentially from the bad roots while our joy and happiness comes from the good ones. It is important to know and understand these roots if we are going to make an end of suffering and attain true peace and happiness. This book explains in a penetrative way the nature of these six roots. It contains discourses of the Buddha on the subject together with traditional commentarial explanations.
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