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Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > Suttas

Begin_Pali_Suttas.pdf
Begin_Pali_Suttas.pdfBeginnings: The Pali Suttas1563 viewsExcept where otherwise noted, all factual information in this essay is garnered from the Pāḷi Suttas and their companion-piece, the Vinaya. In these texts we find accounts of the first months following the Buddha’s awakening (Khandhaka I, Mahāvagga, Vinaya), of the final months before his decease (Sutta 16, Dīgha Nikāya), of the events leading up to the First and Second Councils, together with an account of those Councils (Khandhakas XI and XIi, Cullavagga, Vinaya), and, scattered through the texts, incidental information and clues about the middle period of the Buddha’s ministry. Considerable additional information is available in texts of later date, such as the Classical Commentaries.
damachak.pdf
damachak.pdfDhammacakkappavattana Sutta3826 viewsVen. Mahasi Sayadaw

The First Discourse of the Buddha, namely the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta, commonly known as the Great Discourse on the Wheel of Dhamma. This is a series of discourses on the Dhammacakka Sutta by the late Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw, a Questioner at the Sixth Buddhist Council in Myanmar, (Burma) 1954. Translated by U Ko Lay.
damapada.pdf
damapada.pdfThe Dhammapada, a Translation2545 viewsVen. Thanissaro, Bhikkhu

The Dhammapada has long been recognized as one of the masterpieces of early Buddhist literature. Only more recently have scholars realized that it is also one of the early masterpieces of the Indian tradition of Kavya, or belles lettres. This translation is an attempt to render the verses into English in a way that does justice to both of the traditions to which the text belongs. Although it is tempting to view these traditions as distinct, dealing with form (Kavya) and content (Buddhism), the ideals of Kavya aimed at combining form and content into a seamless whole.
dhammapadatxt1.pdf
dhammapadatxt1.pdfTreasury of Truth - Dhammapada2249 viewsVen. Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero

This work lends itself readily to an in-depth study of this religious classic of mankind, to the great delight of both the scholar and the student. This PDF file is the text version only of the Illustrated Dhammapada by Ven. Sarada Maha Thero. The Pali text has explanatory translation of the verses with commentary in English.
dhammapada_illustrated.zip
dhammapada_illustrated.zipTreasury of Truth1869 viewsThis is the Illustrated version of the Dhammapada or Treasury of Truth, compiled by Venerable Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero.
First_Discourse-Comparison_of_Versions.pdf
First_Discourse-Comparison_of_Versions.pdfThe Buddha's First Discourse: a Comparision of Versions1800 viewsThis is a study of the Dhammacakka-Pavattana-Sutta, officially considered the first discourse of the Buddha. The tradition acknowledges that he spoke about his teaching before the occasion of the delivery of this discourse. This study was undertaken during my Buddhist studies, which was one major of my Batchelor of Arts at the University of Queensland, completed in 2004. The study compares 17 possible versions of this discourse from four languages: Pali, Chinese, Tibetan and Sanskrit. Some interesting differences are discovered and an attempt is made to explain them. An expected core of all the discourses stands out, which shows why all major schools of Buddhism accept the Four Noble Truths as the essential teaching of the Buddha.
FromCraving.pdf
FromCraving.pdfFrom Craving to Liberation (1)1876 viewsExcursions into the Thought-world of the Pali Discourses

The essays collected in the present book are revised versions of entries originally published in the Encyclopaedia of Buddhism, Sri Lanka. My main emphasis in each case is on exploring a particular term from the perspective of the early Pali discourses, while other sources − be these later Pali works, Chinese parallels, or secondary publications on the matter at hand − are taken into consideration only in a supplementary fashion.
FromGrasping.pdf
FromGrasping.pdfFrom Grasping to Emptiness (2)1762 viewsExcursions into the Thought-world of the Pali Discourses

The present book is based on revised versions of entries originally published in the Encyclopaedia of Buddhism, Sri Lanka. It forms the second volume of my "Excursions into the Thought-world of the Pali discourses", complementing the previously published "From Craving to Liberation".
Karaniya_Metta_Sutta3.pdf
Karaniya_Metta_Sutta3.pdfKaraniya Metta Sutta2408 viewsThis is a popular discourse, in the form of a poem, and one of the best known and most cited and recited in Theravada Buddhist countries. It is found in the Pali Canon's Khuddakapatha and Sutta Nipata with the title Metta Sutta (The Discourse on Friendliness). However, in order to
distinguish it from other `Metta-suttas' in the Pali Canon, this particular Metta Sutta is traditionally known as Karaniya Metta Sutta because its first verse commences with the Pali word Karaniya (one should act thus).
mahasati.pdf
mahasati.pdfMaha Satipatthana Sutta2695 viewsVen. U Jotika and Ven. U Dhamminda

Practise in accordance with this Mahasatipatthana Sutta so that you can see why it is acknowledged as the most important Sutta that the Buddha taught. Try to practise all the different sections from time to time as they are all useful, but in the beginning start with something simple such as being mindful while walking, or the mindfulness of in and out breathing. Then as you practise these you will be able to practise the other sections contained within this Sutta and you will find that all the four satipatthanas can be practised concurrently. A Sutta should be read again and again as you will tend to forget its message. The message here in this Sutta is that you should be mindful of whatever is occurring in the body and mind, whether it be good or bad, and thus you will become aware that all conditioned phenomena are impermanent, unsatisfactory and not self.
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