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Last additions - Buddhist Meditation
Whitge-Lotus-Ascetic1-106.pdf
Whitge-Lotus-Ascetic1-106.pdfThe White Lotus Ascetic (Text)1103 viewsAbout fifty years ago, the late Venerable Mahasi Sayadaw of Myanmar introduced the technique of focusing one’s attention on the ‘rising and falling’ movement of the abdomen as an object to develop mindfulness. Thus meditators practise Satipatthana developing momentary concentration to achieve purification of mind, without the need to develop mundane jhana. Satipatthana Vipassana meditation became very popular among monks as well as the laity and many new Vipassana meditation centers sprang up all over the world to cater to the growing demand.Aug 14, 2016
5_Hindrances_02ed_28Buddhanet29.pdf
5_Hindrances_02ed_28Buddhanet29.pdfMahaSatipatthana Sutta:Establishment of Mindfulness on 5 Hindrances2281 viewsIn this book, Bro James explained how to establish mindfulness on these 5 Hindrances and why it is important to do so. Written as if spoken in simple Malaysian English, he continued to draw upon his personal experience to explain and supplement the exposition of the Discourse. Connecting the dots between Text and life, he illustrates it with modern day scenarios enabling us to see how the practice is applied – in both formal practice and daily life today.Aug 14, 2016
Beginners2ed_28Buddhanet29.pdf
Beginners2ed_28Buddhanet29.pdfMahaSatipatthana Sutta: Great Discourse on Four-Fold Establishment of Mindfulness1559 viewsThis book explains Satipatthana or mindfulness practice by going directly and referring to this Discourse, which the Buddha originally expounded to the people of Kurus. So here we return to the basic orthodox Discourse spoken by the Buddha as a guide. In this way you gain a complete understanding of what the Buddha really taught. You can also gauge whether you are on the right track or if there is any missing part in your practice that you might need to include.Aug 14, 2016
Anapanasati_appreciation.pdf
Anapanasati_appreciation.pdfAnapanasati Sutra Appreciation (MN 118)1675 viewsFulfilling Awareness of the Breath Meditation

This is a concise and straightforward appreciation of the Anapanasati Sutta (MN 118). What makes this appreciation different is the emphasis on personal meditative insight leading to deepening wisdom through practical meditation instruction.
Sep 12, 2015
MEDITATE_365.pdf
MEDITATE_365.pdfMEDITATE 365 2665 viewsBrother Pho Quan has made a detailed meditation offering, covering the entire spectrum of Buddhist practice from beginners to full wisdom. Following Insight Meditation as detailed in the Theravada Pali Canon, a guided meditation per day is shared over an entire year.

The book is in a PDF file format with 12 chapters covering the 12 months of the year. With each month a particular Buddhist theme is highlighted (i.e. impermanence, non-self, the Four Noble Truths, Conditions Arising, etc.). At the left side bar of the eBook page as well as the table of contents are links taking the reader to each monthly themed section of meditations.
Jan 12, 2015
bps-essay_45.pdf
bps-essay_45.pdfTwo Styles of Insight Meditation1844 viewsToday the practice of insight meditation has gained global popularity, yet in achieving this success it has undergone a subtle metamorphosis. Rather than being taught as an integral part of the Buddhist path, it is now often presented as a secular discipline whose fruits pertain more to life within the world than to supramundane release. Many meditators testify to the tangible benefits they have gained from the practice of insight meditation, benefits that range from enhanced job performance and better relationships to deeper calm, more compassion, and greater awareness. However, while such benefits may certainly be worthwhile in their own right, taken by themselves they are not the final goal that the Buddha himself holds up as the end point of his training. That goal, in the terminology of the texts, is the attainment of Nibbana, the destruction of all defilements here and now and deliverance from the beginningless round of rebirths.Jun 16, 2014
Mindfulness_Breathing.pdf
Mindfulness_Breathing.pdfMindfulness of Breathing2450 viewsThis is a useful anthology of important and pragmatic source material from the Pali Canon and Commentaries on the technique of Anapana, or breath-awareness meditation. It includes the Discourse on Respiration-Mindfulness from the Majjhima Nikaya, commentary from the Vishuddhimagga (Path of Purification), and analyses of other passages and Suttas.Nov 15, 2013
The_Anapanasati_Sutta_2.pdf
The_Anapanasati_Sutta_2.pdfThe Anapanasati Sutta2662 viewsA Practical Guide to Mindfulness of Breathing and Tranquil Wisdom Meditation. This is a meditation instruction book, written by an American monk who currently runs the Dhamma Sukha Meditation Center in Missouri. While the subject material is nothing new, the Venerable. offers a different (and somewhat controversial) point of view on the practicing of the Tranquil Wisdom meditation that is well worth the read. Nov 15, 2013
08Taking_the_Practice_Home.pdf
08Taking_the_Practice_Home.pdfTaking the Practice Home1804 viewsIf meditation is to have any relevance to everyday life it has to be done at home. This does not mean just your residence but wherever your attention happens to reside. To meditate at home requires a 'hands-on', dynamic approach that is not restricted to any particular time, place or posture. When applied in this way, it becomes integrated into the ordinary activities of life and becomes the basis for a meditative lifestyle in the home and the routine of everyday life.Sep 27, 2013
07Support_of_Loving-kindness.pdf
07Support_of_Loving-kindness.pdfSupport of Loving-kindness Meditation1576 viewsAfter the meditator is established in the basics of Vipassana meditation, Loving-kindness meditation can be used to support the more challenging Vipassana practice. While this is switching meditation modes to a concentration-based practice, its benefit is that it uplifts and sweetens the mind and helps meditators to cope with negative emotions that they may not yet be able to deal with in their Vipassana practice.Sep 27, 2013
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