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Home > eBook Library > Buddhist Meditation > Meditative Practices

Most viewed - Meditative Practices
Forest_Dhamma.pdf
Forest_Dhamma.pdfForest Dhamma: A Selection of Talks on Buddhist Practice2796 viewsTraining the heart to attain happiness is the way that all the Buddhas proclaimed to be the right and true way. When our hearts never have time to rest and attain calm, they are not fundamentally different from those of animals. But when our hearts rest, relax and receive training, we will be able to see the harmful affects of thinking and imagining, and turbulence they cause in the heart. Then we will come to see the value of a calm heart. Once we have attained a state of mental calm, we will have reached the first stage of Dhamma, which will lead us steadily onwards. In other words, we will have a firmly established faith in the principles of Dhamma...
nibbana1.pdf
nibbana1.pdfThe Practice which Leads to Nibbana2478 viewsVen. Pa-Auk Sayadaw

Translated by Greg Kleiman. This is the method of practising meditation that is taught at Pa Auk Tawya Monastery, (Myanmar) Burma. It is based on the explanation of meditation found in the Visuddhimagga commentary. Because of that the method involves several stages of practice which are complex, and involved. These stages include a detailed analysis of both mentality and matter, according to all the categories enumerated in the Abhidhamma, and the further use of this understanding to discern the process of Dependent Origination as it occurs in the Past, Present, and Future. Therefore people who are unfamiliar with the Visuddhimagga and the Abhidhamma will have difficulty in understanding and developing a clear picture of the practice of meditation at Pa Auk Tawya. For foreigners who cannot speak Burmese this problem is made even more difficult. This introduction has been written to help alleviate these difficulties by presenting a simplified example of a successful meditator's path of progress as he develops his meditation at Pa Auk Tawya.
bps-essay_45.pdf
bps-essay_45.pdfTwo Styles of Insight Meditation2137 viewsToday the practice of insight meditation has gained global popularity, yet in achieving this success it has undergone a subtle metamorphosis. Rather than being taught as an integral part of the Buddhist path, it is now often presented as a secular discipline whose fruits pertain more to life within the world than to supramundane release. Many meditators testify to the tangible benefits they have gained from the practice of insight meditation, benefits that range from enhanced job performance and better relationships to deeper calm, more compassion, and greater awareness. However, while such benefits may certainly be worthwhile in their own right, taken by themselves they are not the final goal that the Buddha himself holds up as the end point of his training. That goal, in the terminology of the texts, is the attainment of Nibbana, the destruction of all defilements here and now and deliverance from the beginningless round of rebirths.
Info-Meditation-Centers-Sri-Lanka2013.pdf
Info-Meditation-Centers-Sri-Lanka2013.pdfInformation about Meditation Centers in Sri Lanka - 20131340 viewsThere are many monasteries and meditation centers in Sri Lanka, but only few of these are suitable for foreigners who are new to Sri Lanka and only stay for a short time. The following information is specifically intended for them. Both males and females can stay in all of these places, albeit separate.
Monasteries-Meditation-Centres-Sri-Lanka2013.pdf
Monasteries-Meditation-Centres-Sri-Lanka2013.pdfBuddhist Forest Monasteries and Meditation Centres in Sri Lanka 1004 viewsUpdated: April 2013

In Sri Lanka there are many forest hermitages and meditation centres suitable for foreign Buddhist monastics or for experienced lay Buddhists. The following information is particularly intended for Western bhikkhus, those who aspire to become bhikkhus, and those who are experienced lay practitioners.
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