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Home > Audio Library > Vipassana & Loving-kindness Meditation > Bodhi Tree Vipassana Retreat - Patrick Kearney

Top rated - Bodhi Tree Vipassana Retreat - Patrick Kearney
File02_(AM)_Introducing_Mahasi_method.mp3
File02_(AM)_Introducing_Mahasi_method.mp3Introducing Mahasi Method1908 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

Today we introduce the method of meditation we are practising during this retreat. Yesterday morning we just brought a sense of open curiosity to the examination of mind/body experience. This morning we are applying system to this investigation, stimulating what the Buddha calls yoniso manasikara, “appropriate attention.” We do this through the meditation method created by Mahasi Sayadaw of Burma (1904-1982), which is structured by his division of experience into primary and secondary object, along with the fundamental activities of noting, naming and noticing.
44444
(8 votes)
File04_(AM)_Contemplating_elements.mp3
File04_(AM)_Contemplating_elements.mp3Contemplating the Elements929 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

The foundation of satipatthana (establishing mindfulness) is the tracking (anupassana), or contemplation, of our experience of body. As we remain present to physical experience over time, we learn to drop beneath our concepts of body to its direct, sensual impact. What we normally take to be “my body” becomes, as we go deeper, different manifestations of the four elements of earth, air, fire and water.
44444
(3 votes)
File01_At_Bodh_Gaya.mp3
File01_At_Bodh_Gaya.mp3At Bodh Gaya1141 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Forest Monastery (2009)

Tonight we look at the Buddha's activities during the weeks immediately after his awakening. We see him as a powerful shaman, and how he wrestled with the question of whether or not he should attempt to communicate his awakening. It took the intervention of Brahma Sahampati to persuade him to teach. Why was the Buddha so reluctant? And what does his reluctance tell us about the dharma he wanted to teach — and about himself?
44444
(2 votes)
File09_Not-self.mp3
File09_Not-self.mp3Not-Self957 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

We come to Anattalakkhana Sutta (Characteristics of not-self), where the Buddha presents the five aggregates associated with clinging and reveals their real nature. The five aggregates are one of the two main ways in which the Buddha analyses the nature of the human being. They represent what we cling to to create our sense of who we are and what the world is.

We look at the Buddha’s description of how we construct our identity through the three movements of: craving (tanha), the drive to possess; conceit (mana), our fundamental sense of separation and identity; and view (ditthi), the completed concept we have of ourselves-within-our-world. We consider how the Buddha's understanding of not-self (anatta) plays out in his understanding of life-after-life. If there is, fundamentally, no-one here, then who moves from one life to another?
33333
(4 votes)
File13_Preparing_the_fire.mp3
File13_Preparing_the_fire.mp3Preparing the Fire669 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

Tonight we follow the Buddha from Baranasi back to the area where he practised before his awakening, the Nerañjara River near Gaya. First, at Baranasi, the Buddha awakens Yasa, the son of a rich banker. This is the first time the Buddha awakens a lay person, proving the dharma can be understood by the laity as well as by professional ascetics; and the first time the Buddha gives a “graduated discourse,” which becomes the basic template of his teaching method. Yet this is not counted as the third teaching. Why not?

After his successes in Baranasi the Buddha goes alone to visit Uruvela Kassapa, the important head of an order of dreadlocks ascetics. He spends at least a month performing miracles to convert Kassapa and his followers. Why was Kassapa so important? Finally the Buddha leads the newly converted ascetics to Gayasisa, near Gaya, to give them the third teaching, Adittapariyaya Sutta (Burning …).
33333
(2 votes)
File12_(AM)_Contemplating_citta.mp3
File12_(AM)_Contemplating_citta.mp3Contemplating Citta695 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

This morning we are looking at how we can track the state of our citta. Citta is a key technical term used by the Buddha. It could be translated as “mind,” “heart,” “heart-mind,” or even “soul,” in the non-theological sense of that word. In the context of our practice, citta represents our inner state; how we are, at this time. It is intimately connected to the body, and is in a state of constant change. While the state of our citta may be quite subtle, often we are moved to contemplate it when we find ourselves disturbed by emotion. Here we discuss using emotion as a meditation object.
33333
(2 votes)
File10_(AM)_Contemplating_the_thought-stream.mp3
File10_(AM)_Contemplating_the_thought-stream.mp3Contemplating the Thought-stream942 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

Our addiction to thinking creates a major barrier to settling into Samadhi, “unification” or “concentration.” Often we try to push thought away, or simply endure it as an unpleasant fact of life. But the essence of this practice, according to Mahasi Sayadaw, is to note, or be deliberately aware of, whatever is predominant in any of the six sense fields, now. If thinking is currently predominant, then thinking should be our meditation
33333
(2 votes)
File08_(AM)_Contemplating_feeling.mp3
File08_(AM)_Contemplating_feeling.mp3Contemplatingt Feeling824 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

This morning we move onto the third satipatthana, that of vedana, usually translated “feeling.” We explore what we mean by feeling, and try to come to an understanding of what the Buddha means by “vedana.” Vedana can be seen as the affective aspect of experience, the capacity of any given experience to move us in some way — to provoke a response. For the Buddha, feeling and response are inextricably linked. To understand what we do, we must understand what — and how — we feel.
33333
(2 votes)
File06_(AM)_Contemplating_breathing.mp3
File06_(AM)_Contemplating_breathing.mp3Contemplating Breathing837 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

This morning we experiment with breathing as our meditation object. We learn to experience breathing as air element (vayo dhatu) — the movements within the body associated with inhalation and exhalation — and cultivate a sense of detail and precision in tracking these movements.
33333
(2 votes)
File14_(AM)_The_last_full_day.mp3
File14_(AM)_The_last_full_day.mp3The Last Full Day614 viewsPatrick Kearney's Vipassana Retreat Talk at Bodhi Tree Monastery (2009)

This morning we review the nature of the practice, applying it to the circumstances we presently find ourselves in — the final full day of this retreat.
22222
(2 votes)
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