Buddhist eLibrary - An Online Digitl Resource Library Home :: Login
 
 
Home About Contact Admin Choose a language
eBook Library Image Library Audio Library Video Library
 
 
Partners
Launch Mobile Site
Buddhist eLibrary Feature: Buddhist Studies
Links
exabytes network
Home > eBook Library > Theravada Texts > Buddhist Precepts / Sila

Top rated - Buddhist Precepts / Sila
8_Precepts_Letter_Middle-Way.pdf
8_Precepts_Letter_Middle-Way.pdfEight Precepts Letter to Middle-Way1109 viewsA letter from Jacquetta Gomes (Bodhicarini Upasika Jayasili), BGKT Buddhist Group of Kendal (Theravada), in response to Roger Farrington, ‘Should Buddhists be Teetotallers?’, The Middle Way: Journal of The Buddhist Society, 85 (3) November 2010, pp.167–70. The letter explains that Ajivatthamaka Sila (Eight Precepts with Right Livelihood as the Eighth clarify the alcohol issue and explain how alcohol is included in the DKP (Dasa Kusala Kamma-patha) Ten Wholesome Courses of Action.55555
(1 votes)
DP_Eight_Lifetime_Precepts.pdf
DP_Eight_Lifetime_Precepts.pdfEight Lifetime Precepts776 viewsEight Lifetime Precepts are an expansion of Ajivatthamaka Sila. The first seven Precepts are the same but the eighth Precept is an amalgamation of the eighth Precept of Ajivatthamaka Sila and the fifth Precept of Panca Sila (The Five Precepts): I undertake the training rule [Precept] to abstain from wrong livelihood; and drinks and drugs that cause heedlessness.55555
(1 votes)
Panca_Sila_Requirements_Certificate.pdf
Panca_Sila_Requirements_Certificate.pdfPanca Sila: Certificate Requirements and Ceremonies827 viewsDhamma Teachers Certificate Requirements and Ceremonies
BGKT Buddhist Group of Kendal (Theravada) and Ketumati Buddhist Vihara, Requirements and Ceremonies for The Five Precepts (Pañca Sīla) The Eight Precepts with Right Livelihood as the Eighth (Ājīvatthamaka Sīla) Dhamma Teachers Certificate.
33333
(1 votes)
Panca_Sila_Pali_Canon.pdf
Panca_Sila_Pali_Canon.pdfPanca Sila (The Five Precepts) in The Pali Canon1226 viewsIn some suttas only the first four precepts are mentioned, whereas all five precepts are described together in other suttas. The first four precepts are pakati-sila whereas the fifth precept is pannati-sila. Venerable Nyanatiloka explains in his Buddhist Dictionary that pakati-sila [is] natural or genuine morality, [which] is distinct from those outward rules of conduct laid down for either laymen or monks. Those latter are the so-called prescribed morality (pannatti-sila).
Suttas which include The Five Precepts are listed.
11111
(1 votes)
4 files on 1 page(s)

Social Bookmarks